environmental crime

COP26: Glasgow Climate Change Conference

The COP26 UN climate change conference set to take place in Glasgow in November 2020 has been postponed due to COVID-19.  This decision has been taken by the COP Bureau of the UNFCCC (United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change), with the UK and its Italian partners.

Dates for a rescheduled conference in 2021, hosted in Glasgow by the UK in partnership with Italy, have been set to 1-12 November 2021.

In light of the ongoing, worldwide effects of COVID-19, holding an ambitious, inclusive COP26 in November 2020 was no longer possible. Rescheduling will ensure all parties can focus on the issues to be discussed at this vital conference and allow more time for the necessary preparations to take place. We will continue to work with all involved to increase climate ambition, build resilience and lower emissions.

COP 26 side events/exhibits – organizations with admission status in the UNFCCC process and Parties partnering with an admitted organization(s) are eligible to apply for a side event and/or an exhibit, using the side events and exhibits online application system (SEORS) managed by the UNFCCC secretariat. The schedule for its opening for COP 26 will be announced on this site. Eligibility, selection and allocation criteria are available on this webpage.

More COP26 info from the host country provided here: ukcop26.org

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org

High-Level Dialogue on Energy

UN Secretary-General António Guterres announced that he will convene the UN High-level Dialogue on Energy virtually on Friday, 24 September 2021, under the auspices of the UN General Assembly.

A series of Leadership Dialogues will feature Heads of State and Government as well as other global leaders, many of whom are expected to announce commitments in the form of “Energy Compacts,” aimed at achieving clean, affordable energy for all by 2030 (SDG7) and net zero emissions by 2050. More details about Energy Compacts can be found here.

The Dialogue will result in a global roadmap towards the achievement of SDG 7 by 2030 and net zero emissions by 2050, building on the outcome of the Ministerial Thematic Forums and the reports of Technical Working Groups released in June.

Stakeholders Participation

To bring together businesses, cities, foundations, youth and other civil society representatives to announce their own Energy Compact commitments and mobilize partnerships for transformative action, multi-stakeholder energy action pre-events are also being organized virtually on the mornings of 22 and 23 September, details to be announced.

Energy Compacts registration

All stakeholders are urged to submit their Compact commitments by 31 August, in order to ensure that they are reviewed and registered in time to be given visibility at the High-level Dialogue on Energy in September.

Recording of the Deep-dive Stakeholders Workshop on Energy Compacts (held on 19 August 2021) is now available here, with detailed presentation on how to prepare and submit your commitments. Find more about the process and submit your Energy Compact here.

Details on the Dialogue are to be announced shortly on the HLDE website.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org.

Faith & Climate Summit: The Final Sprint to COP26

We are at the precipice of a crucial decade that will decide the trajectory of our future. We must mitigate greenhouse gas emissions substantially in the next ten years. As COP26 rapidly approaches, Parliament and its partners will hold a Faith & Climate Summit. We will discuss the ways faith communities around the world can best support, influence, and respond to the COP26 negotiations and integrate climate action into their work.

Join us for a discussion with the global interfaith community about our role heading into COP26 and beyond. The UK COP26 Presidency will give an update on the status of negotiations. We will also announce new faith-based climate commitments. Reach out to Joshua Basofin at joshua@parliamentofreligions.org to discuss your organization’s climate commitment.

Register here!

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org.

Nuclear weapons & climate change: Intergenerational action for a sustainable world

UNFOLD ZERO joins our partners Youth Fusion and Parliamentarians for Nuclear Non-proliferation and Disarmament in inviting you to a unique event Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change on September 9.

The event, which is held in commemoration of the International Day Against Nuclear Tests, brings youth leaders in nuclear abolition and climate action together with legislators, experts and civil society leaders in a dynamic inter-generational dialogue.

Nuclear Weapons and Climate Change will focus on two of our time’s most pressing global challenges: climate change and the threat of nuclear war, as well as the links between them. It is structured as an intergenerational dialogue of youth leaders with legislators, experts, officials and other participants.

This will be a hybrid event with some speakers and invited guests participating in-person at the event hub, while most others will participate online.

Time: 2-4pm London / 9-11am Eastern Time USA / 3-5pm Central Europe / 7-9pm Kazakhstan

UNFOLD ZERO is a platform for United Nations (UN) focused initiatives and actions for the achievement of a nuclear weapons free world. It’s an affiliated network of Abolition 2000 and a joint project of Basel Peace Office, Mayors for Peace 2020 Vision Campaign, PNND, PragueVision, Aotearoa Lawyers for Peace and Global Security Institute.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Intergenerational Solidarity, please email the vice chair at susanneseperson@gmail.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Children’s Rights-NY, please visit childrightsny.org.

Global Interfaith Dialogue on Food Systems

In the run up to the UN Food Systems Summit later in September,  the Global Inter-faith Dialogue on Food Systems builds up on the dialogue held in July, aiming to bring together faith-based organisations, Indigenous communities, and others whose work is grounded in values and spirituality and who play an essential role in the sustainable transformation of the food systems. 

Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJEqcO-vqzMiGNDWKYK3YiRDYqg0G0IkyAL7

The specific objectives of the consultation are: 

1. Promote engagement and partnerships between faith-based organisations, indigenous peoples, governments, multilateral organisations, and corporations for more sustainable and just food systems

2.  Facilitate conversation around the role of values, ethics, and belief systems into new and better food systems, with a focus on areas for action

Expected outputs:

1. Increased awareness of the important role of faith, values, and belief systems in food systems transformation

2. Lift up good practices and areas for collective action between the work of faith-based, indigenous communities, and other stakeholders in support of achieving the SDGs by 2030

3. An interfaith reflection and a Statement for a sustainable food system   

Co-Convenors: Dr. Agnes Kalibata, UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy of the 2021 Food Systems Summit, and Andrew Schwartz, Director of Sustainability and Global Affairs, Center for Earth Ethics.  Curator: Dr. Manoj Kurian, Coordinator, World Council of Churches- Ecumenical Advocacy Alliance

The programme will have brief inputs from key discussants and there will be a substantial session for group work and reporting. The discussants include Ms. Karenna Gore, Director of the Center for Earth Ethics, Rev. Andrew Morley, President and CEO, World Vision International, and ordained curate of the Anglican Church, Ms. Lyla June Johnston, representing Indigenous Peoples, Mr. Anwar Khan, President, of Islamic Relief USA and  Bishop Rev. Dr. Sabu K. Cherian, from the Church of South India.

As part of the output, an interfaith Reflection and Statement that is addressed to the UN Food Systems Summit  will be introduced and be read by Mr. Steve Chiu – Buddhist Tzu Chi Foundation and Dr. Meera Baindur – Associate Professor (Philosophy), Department of Arts, Manipal University Jaipur.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org.

The Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone Treaty: Protocol and the Way Forward

The Southeast Asia Nuclear Weapon-Free Zone Treaty (SEANWFZ Treaty) was signed in Bangkok on 15 December 1995 by 10 Southeast Asian States (ASEAN Member States) and entered into force on 27 March 1997, committing the region to nuclear disarmament and non-proliferation in line with the 1971 Declaration on the Zone of Peace, Freedom and Neutrality (ZOPFAN). The webinar falls under the implementation of Action 5 of United Nations Secretary-General António Guterres’ Agenda for Disarmament: Securing Our Common Future, which aims to strengthen and consolidate nuclear-weapon-free zones, including by facilitating enhanced cooperation and consultation between existing zones, encouraging nuclear-weapon States (NWS) to adhere to the relevant protocols to the treaties establishing such zones.

Co-organized by the United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs and the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies (CNS) of the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey, this event aims to raise awareness on the issue of the SEANWFZ Treaty and to generate ideas for accelerating the signing and ratification of the Protocol to the Treaty by the NWS.

The webinar is open for participation by New York, Geneva and Vienna-based diplomats, academia and representatives of civil society. Speakers will engage in a moderated discussion representing different perspectives on the challenges surrounding implementation of the SEANWFZ, followed by a Q&A session with the audience.

Register here!

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP.

International Day Against Nuclear Tests

Since nuclear weapons testing began on 16 July 1945, over 2,000 have taken place. In the early days of nuclear testing little consideration was given to its devastating effects on human life, let alone the dangers of nuclear fallout from atmospheric tests. Hindsight and history have shown us the terrifying and tragic effects of nuclear weapons testing, especially when controlled conditions go awry, and in light of the far more powerful and destructive nuclear weapons that exist today.

On 2 December 2009, the 64th session of the United Nations General Assembly declared 29 August the International Day against Nuclear Tests by unanimously adopting resolution 64/35. The resolution calls for increasing awareness and education “about the effects of nuclear weapon test explosions or any other nuclear explosions and the need for their cessation as one of the means of achieving the goal of a nuclear-weapon-free world.” The resolution was initiated by the Republic of Kazakhstan, together with a large number of sponsors and cosponsors with a view to commemorating the closure of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test site on 29 August 1991.

2010 marked the inaugural commemoration of the International Day against Nuclear Tests. In each subsequent year, the day has been observed by coordinating various activities throughout the world, such as symposia, conferences, exhibits, competitions, publications, lectures, media broadcasts and other initiatives.

Since its establishment, many bilateral and multilateral governmental level developments as well as broad movements in civil society have helped to advance the cause of banning nuclear tests.

Moreover, “convinced that nuclear disarmament and the total elimination of nuclear weapons are the only absolute guarantee against the use or threat of nuclear weapons,” the General Assembly designated 26 September as the “International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons”, which is devoted to furthering the objective of the total elimination of nuclear weapons, through the mobilization of international efforts. The International Day for the Total Elimination of Nuclear Weapons was observed for the first time in September 2014. The International Day against Nuclear Tests, together with other events and actions, has fostered a global environment that strongly advocates for a world free of nuclear weapons.

The international instrument to put an end to all forms of nuclear testing is the 1996 Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). Unfortunately, this has yet to enter into force.

As the Secretary-General recognized in his disarmament agenda “Securing our Common Future” launched on 24 May 2018, the norm against testing is an example of a measure that serves both disarmament and non-proliferation objectives. By constraining the development of advanced new types of nuclear weapons, the CTBT puts a brake on the arms race. It also serves as a powerful normative barrier against potential States that might seek to develop, manufacture and subsequently acquire nuclear weapons in violation of their non-proliferation commitments.

Every effort needs to be made to ensure the entry into force of the CTBT and to preserve its place in the international architecture. In this regard, the Secretary-General appeals to all remaining States whose ratifications are required for the CTBT to enter into force to commit to sign the Treaty at an early date if they have not already done so, and to accelerate the completion of their ratification processes.

It is the hope of the UN that one day all nuclear weapons will be eliminated. Until then, there is a need to observe International Day against Nuclear Tests as the world works towards promoting peace and security.

To learn more about the background and significance of this observance, please visit un.org/en/observances/end-nuclear-tests-day.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@gmail.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

World Water Week 2021: Building Resilience Faster

World Water Week is the annual focal point for the globe’s water issues. Organized by SIWI, this year’s event will be held entirely online, in a new, digital format designed to ensure that people across the world can collaborate to find solutions to the most pressing water-related challenges.

Under the theme “Building Resilience Faster,” World Water Week 2021 will address such issues as the climate crisis, water scarcity, food security, health, biodiversity, and impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic. While the event is usually held in Stockholm, hosting 4,000 people from more than 135 countries, the 2021 conference will be fully digital to ensure that this important forum can take place despite the ongoing pandemic.

The World Bank Group will convene and participate in over 50 sessions of World Water Week 2021 taking place from August 23-27. Please click on the “Sessions” tab for a list of World Bank Group (co)-convened sessions and sessions with World Bank Group participating speakers.

You can also follow our sessions along via @WorldBankWater using #wwweek.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP.

2nd Open Science Conference: From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate Change

You are invited to attend the Second United Nations Open Science Conference, From Tackling the Pandemic to Addressing Climate ChangeThis three-day virtual Conference will take place on 21-23 July 2021 and is organized by the United Nations Department of Global Communications, the Dag Hammarskjöld Library and the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Division for Sustainable Development Goals.

The conference will bring the global discussion on the connection between open science and climate action to the United Nations in New York and will highlight open science initiatives and infrastructures from around the world as well as policies that can strengthen these. Policy makers, librarians, publishers and research practitioners will discuss what open science has learned – and is still learning – from tackling COVID-19, and how this can be applied into actions addressing the global climate crisis, at the interface of science, technology, policy and research.

In cooperation with the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition (SPARC), the Conference will also engage with early career leaders advancing openness in research and education at a time of lockdowns, and has invited them into conversation with established leaders and policy makers in this key area for advancing the 2030 Agenda.

More information on the conference programme, including registration, is available on the website (Twitter hashtag: #OpenScienceUN).

Kind regards,

Division for Sustainable Development Goals, UNDESA

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

No-First-Use: A powerful tool to achieve a world without nuclear weapons

Dear colleagues,

We draw your attention to the international launch on July 15 of NoFirstUse Global, a campaign platform and network promoting no-first-use policies globally as a measure to prevent nuclear war and to help achieve a nuclear-weapon-free world.

Support for No-First-Use policies is growing in nuclear armed countries and around the world, as evidenced by the recent Open Letter to Presidents Biden and Putin on No-First-Use which was endorsed by over 1200 political, military and religious leaders, as well as legislators, academics/scientists and other representatives of civil society. Find out more by attending the launch event.

Register here for Session B, which is timed for the Americas, Europe, Africa and the Middle East: us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_LIMFa4HXTzqCVaAKToVr1Q

July 15 Program:

  • Tribute for the 76th anniversary of the Trinity nuclear test;
  • Introductions to NoFirstUse Global from cosponsoring organizations;
  • Video messages from prominent supporters;
  • Launch of a social media action ‘Don’t even think about starting a nuclear war’
  • Questions and comments from the audience/participants

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@gmail.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

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