human rights

{Virtual} UN75 Global Governance Forum (Day 1)

OPENING PLENARY

9:00am – 10:30am

Livestream Link: https://livestream.com/accounts/22723452/UN75GGForumSept16

Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/REUF-0065

CONCURRENT DIALOGUES

Post-COVID Recovery and the Future of Global Economic and Social Governance
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86964411976  Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/BBWD-3967

The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center has tracked more than 25 million confirmed cases of the virus globally, already causing nearly 850 thousand deaths (by 1 September 2020). The remarkable speed, global reach, and ease by which the virus crossed borders and is being transmitted between people have sent stock markets tumbling worldwide, with the World Bank projecting the deepest global recession since World War II (an estimated 5.2 percent contraction in global GDP in 2020). This excessive volatility, the sudden drop in confidence by consumers, and severe knock-on economic and social effects have resulted in a swift overnight contraction in cross-border finance, trade, air travel, and other sectors of our hyperconnected global economy, as well as millions of job losses. This session will examine measures to overhaul our system of global economic and social governance, both to respond to the immediate challenge of recovery from COVID-19 and redouble efforts to advance the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

Rethinking the World’s System of Collective Security 75 Years After San Francisco
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89314705291 Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/JJUP-0643

75 years after its inception, the United Nations faces daunting challenges regarding one of its main tasks: the maintenance of international peace and security. Multiple, concurrent, and recurring intrastate conflicts, exploited by international state and non-state actors, have reversed the declining global trends in political violence witnessed since the end of the Cold War, fueling refugee movements and human suffering, particularly in the fragile and less developed countries. Moreover, the modernization of nuclear weapons arsenals and the collapse of the existing control and disarmament regimes are adding to the global threat scenario. At the same time, the growing roles of women, civil society organizations, and businesses, whose voices are amplified through modern communications technologies, offer new opportunities for effective peacebuilding and governance reform and renewal while more research illustrates the effectiveness of organizing and nonmilitary approaches to security. The complexity of the 21st-century challenges to global peace and security requires a far-reaching overhaul of a peace and security architecture with the United Nations at its core. This discussion, therefore, takes off with a set of proposed reforms to the peace and security architecture of the United Nations that were developed in expert discussions prior to the September 2020 Forum.

Reimagining the Global Human Rights and Humanitarian Architecture
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84866014310 Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/XXTS-2744

Though a latecomer to the United Nations system’s informal “pillar structure” (and despite fears of backsliding in recent years), human rights has assumed over the past two decades a central space on the United Nations Agenda, alongside more traditional concerns with peace and security and sustainable development. Similarly, with the 2016 World Humanitarian Summit, the worst refugee crisis worldwide since the Second World War, and proliferation of urgent human needs accompanying the COVID-19 pandemic, the viability and design of the global humanitarian system has also moved to the forefront of international policy-making. This session will explore steps to reimagine and improve the global human rights and humanitarian architecture, leveraging the United Nations’ 75th Anniversary Commemoration and Declaration in novel ways to ensure that “We The Peoples” drive deliberations on the future of global governance.

Climate Governance: The Paris Agreement and Beyond
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 10:30 am – 12:00 pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86051900433 Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/XVKP-4679

The currently inadequate global governance mechanisms leave humanity exposed to unacceptable levels of risk. Climate and ecological related risks are also interwoven with knock-on effects across other sectors. The window for action is narrowing for the international community, and the current situation calls for unprecedented levels of international cooperation and exponential action across every region of the world, and across the global economy. In response to these catastrophic risks, a number of new business models and technical solutions have been developed and are increasingly being accepted and implemented. However, a truly transformational shift away from a fossil fuel dependency will require global governance solutions that facilitate existing and new ways of delivering on policy goals as described in the Paris Agreement and beyond. This session will explore the leverage points in global climate governance which may allow for solutions to scale and to catalyze the necessary transformation.

A Global Civic Ethic, Countering Rising Nationalism, and The Future of Global Governance
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 12:00 – 1:30 pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/84617435437 Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/MHTX-2168

Especially in an age of rising nationalism, modernizing and making more inclusive our institutions of global governance requires more than creative, often technocratic proposals recommending new tools and structural change. True global governance transformation must be underpinned by a moral and ethical vision for a more just, inclusive, sustainable, and peaceful world. Drawing insights and teachings from major world religions, philosophers, public intellectuals, and other global civil society actors, this session will speak to the moral and ethical principles associated with growing emergence of a Global Civic Ethics and the accompanying notions of global responsibility and citizenship. The roots of — and effective strategies for countering — exclusive forms of nationalism (which undermine and erode efforts to strengthen global cooperation and responsibility) will also be explored.

The Future of Philanthropy in Global Governance
Day and time: Day 1, September 16, 12:00 – 1:30 pm EST

Livestream Webinar Link: https://livestream.com/accounts/22723452/UN75GGForumFOP                                                       Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/YYTU-3866

This lively and interactive session will feature leading voices in the philanthropic sector working, in partnership with civil society, the private sector, governments, and the UN system, to build a more inclusive, effective, and just system of global governance. The dialogue will be framed around the past and present advances in global governance philanthropy, as well as future considerations for philanthropy and global governance systems. It will consider how philanthropic institutions worldwide can best empower and catalyze other partners seeking to achieve progressive changes in the global governance architecture, to better address issues of equitable sustainable development, human rights, and peace and security.

Technology, Financing and Global Governance Partnerships for Good Global Citizenship
Day and time: Day 1, Sept. 16, 12:00 – 1:30pm EST

Zoom Webinar Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89808827586 Translation Link: https://attend.wordly.ai/join/FJZN-0000

In this challenging time, the need for universal connectivity and inclusive finance is greater than ever before. With the backdrop of the United Nations’ 75th anniversary, this session will explore how rapid advances in technology for digital cooperation and new perspectives of global citizens (private and corporate, national and multinational) can advance a more fair global economy for the better. The speakers include thought leaders who are innovating how global collective action problems can be addressed in our hyperconnected global economy. This interactive dialogue will give special attention to transformative approaches for fostering a more secure, just, equitable, and environmentally sustainable recovery to the COVID-19 crisis.

{Virtual} UN75 Global Governance Forum

UN75 Global Governance Forum

SESSIONS

AGENDA

The UN75 Global Governance Forum seeks to promote a more inclusive and effective United Nations through dialogue and recommendations that better harness the ideas, capabilities, and networks of both state and non-state actors for achieving the UN’s commitment to peace, sustainable development, human rights, and a stable climate.

As we approach the 75th Anniversary of the United Nations under the banner “the future we want, the UN we need”, we reflect on the complex challenges facing our world, including cross-border health pandemics, economic shocks, inequality, climate instability, and threats to peace and security, and bring forward a call to action. Talking about what the UN system can do for us and the changes required is important. An even more critical challenge is to engage stakeholders from within and outside the world body to co-create partnerships and pathways to the future we fervently desire and a United Nations that inspires and serves all humanity.

Forum Goals:

  • Initiate a new generation of scale-able, multi-stakeholder partnership iniatives that better harness, for 2020 and beyond, the ideas, capabilities and networks of state & non-state actors for achieving the UN’s commitment to peace, sustainable development, human rights, and a stable climate
  • Build consensus around a strategy for a select number of “global governance institutional, policy, and normative innovations.

 

Welcome Remarks by Moderator

Opening Comments on “Where We’ve Been, What We Hope to Accomplish” by Maureen Connolly, Forum Director Statement from a senior UN Leader (TBD)

Opening Panel on “The Future We Want, The United Nations We Need”

Speakers: Ban Ki-Moon, Eighth UN Secretary-General, Deputy Chair of The Elders, and President & Chair, Global Green Growth Institute

Madeleine Albright, former U.S. Secretary of State, Ambassador to the UN, and Co-Chair, Commission on Global Security, Justice & Governance

Gro Harlem Brundtland, Co-Chair, Global Preparedness Monitoring Board, Member of The Elders, and former Director-General of the World Health Organization and Prime Minister of Norway

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CoNGO Notes: The Conference of Non-Governmental Organizations in Consultative Relationship with the UN has a number of full members participating actively in a variety of initiatives commemorating the 75th anniversary of the United Nations. CoNGO has issued its position on the commemoration by way of two important statements–the CoNGO Declaration on the Occasion of the 75th Anniversary of the UN and the CoNGO Statement on COVID-19 Recovery: Building Back Better.

Massive Online Open Course: Stakeholder Engagement for 2030 Agenda Implementation

Massive Open Online Course (MOOC): Strengthening stakeholder engagement for the implementation and review of the 2030 Agenda

A partnership between the Division for Sustainable Development Goals (DSDG) of UNDESA and UNITAR, this Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) aims at reaching out to a high number of governmental officials and other stakeholders such as UN staff, local governments, civil society and others who expressed an interest in taking this course.

The learning objectives of the course are:
1. To describe the rationale behind the need for Governments to engage with major groups and other stakeholders in formulating and reviewing SDG policies;
2. To learn how to map key national stakeholders with a special focus on those who are the furthest behind;
3. To assess the relevance of different models of engagement practiced by other countries as part of VNRs in their respective countries;
4. To identify practical ways to engage with key national stakeholders, including vulnerable groups, in the context of preparations for VNRs;
5. To develop long-term strategies for ensuring continuous stakeholder engagement as part of regular national review processes for the SDGs.

The MOOC is structured in three modules:
• Module 1. Understanding the need for stakeholder engagement in the 2030 Agenda at the national level
• Module 2. Learning about approaches and tools for strengthening stakeholder engagement for the SDGs
• Module 3. Designing successful strategies for stakeholder engagement in national implementation and review processes for Agenda 2030

Register now herehttps://bit.ly/MOOCSE2020b

a2030@unitar.org

Kind regards,
Division for Sustainable Development Goals

Sustainable Development Goals Knowledge Platform: http://sustainabledevelopment.un.org

 

High-Level Plenary Meeting to Commemorate & Promote the International Day Against Nuclear Tests

[Virtual Tribute] 75th memorial of Hiroshima bombing in the context of BLM

From Tulsa to Hiroshima: The Urgency of Denuclearization to the Necessity of Abolition in America

MIDHEAVEN has partnered with Hiroshima City, Heart of Peace Hiroshima, Hopitow (Hopi Nation),
and others to produce a global virtual tribute with live performances & discussions exploring revolutionary love, radical freedom and listening.

Context: On August 6th, 1945, America detonated a nuclear bomb on Hiroshima, Japan. Today, in the midst of America’s racial crisis there is an opportunity to excavate the root cause of the ideals that have defined America’s actions from its founding: nuclear war is only possible and permissible in a society where the rot of slavery remains. In this historic memorial, Japanese and Black/Brown/Indigenous Peoples share an understanding and agenda as radical change agents for peace.

Access & participate in the tribute here and/or here on August 6

Agenda

CHAPTER 1: HISTORY OF ANTI-PEACE (8:00am – 10:00am EST)
+ Tulsa bombing
+ Hiroshima bombing
+ War’s destruction
+ Reflections via art of the era
+ A people’s history of the United States

CHAPTER 2: REALITY OF WAR (10:00am – 12:00pm EST)
+ Statistics and infographics: people struggling with war
+ Testimony from survivors & scientific/military community
+ War’s negative effects on the environment & our lives

CHAPTER 3: IMAGINATION OF PEACE
(12:00pm – 2:00pm EST)
+ A world with peace as a priority
+ Artistic dreams of utopia: a path forward
+ Statistics and infographics: who & what stops progress

CHAPTER 4: WAR ECONOMY (2:00pm – 4:00pm EST)
+ The investment in war
+ What economic disparity does to the population and the long term effects
+ Testimony from everyday people on the economic effects of war & the aftermath

CHAPTER 5: THE PEACE ECONOMY (4:00pm – 6:00pm EST)
+ Historical view of a way forward
+ Current views
+ Statistics and infographics: actions to take now

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CoNGO Notes: For information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com. For information on the NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values and Global Concerns-NY, visit csvgc-ny.org.  For information on the NGO Committee on Peace-Vienna, 

World Day Against Trafficking in Persons

“Committed to the Cause – Working on the Frontline to End Human Trafficking”

The 2020 theme for the World Day Against Trafficking in Persons will focus on the first responders to human trafficking. These are the people who work in different sectors – identifying, supporting, counseling and seeking justice for victims of trafficking, and challenging the impunity of the traffickers.

During the COVID-19 crisis, the essential role of first responders has become even more important. Particularly as the restrictions imposed by the pandemic have made their work even more difficult. Still, their contribution is often overlooked and unrecognized.

Through stories from first responders describing their practical work in assisting victims UNODC intends to spotlight their contribution and that of their function, institution, organization, team or community and its impact on fighting trafficking.

Find more information here:

How you can get involved:

  • Highlight the work of first responders in your country, community or organization;
  • Share, like and comment on the social media messages for the World Day,
  • Donate to the United NationsVoluntary Trust Fund for Victims of Human Trafficking, which provides on-the-ground assistance and protection to victims of trafficking.

Please use the hashtags #EndHumanTrafficking and #HumanTrafficking on all digital platforms.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org.

[Virtual] Lessons from the Decolonization Era in Confronting the COVID-19 Crisis

Join members of Post-Colonialisms Today in a live event on 29 July discussing African policy responses to the COVID-19 crisis. As the impacts of the crisis are compounded by neoliberalism and colonialism, panelists will reflect on the immediate post-independence period—including initiatives of Nasser, Nkrumah, Nyerere, etc.—to draw lessons for today guided by a vision for structural transformation of the continent.

Please REGISTER here to watch / Veuillez vous INSCRIRE ici pour regarder: bit.ly/DecolCovid

We will also be holding a discussion group on 30 July and invite you to join with your questions and comments.

Please register for the discussion group here: bit.ly/DiscussDecol

We welcome any questions or comments at postcolonialismstoday@regionsrefocus.org.

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CoNGO Notes: On UN Charter Day, 26 June 2020, the President of CoNGO, Liberato Bautista, issued a presidential statement in which, among other things, he said, “The unfinished agenda of decolonization and corollary issues related to self-determination cry out for attention [at the United Nations].” CoNGO also issued on 12 May 2020, the statement “COVID-19 Recovery: Building Back Better” in which it said: “During a crisis, global cooperation and solidarity are urgently needed, but nationalism, racism, intolerance, xenophobia, and border closures have too often prevailed. Measures to fight the pandemic have led to restrictions of long-established civic rights and democratic structures. An effective global response will require building consensus and strengthening concerted action to mitigate the multiple challenges we all face.” For more information about CoNGO, visit www.ngocongo.org.

 

[Webinar] Care & Labor Rights: Challenges from the Capitalist Pandemic

Save the Date, virtual meeting details TBA. Interested attendees are encouraged to check organizer websites or contact co-conveners in the meantime.

Care & Labor Rights: Challenges from the Capitalist Pandemic

This webinar by Development Alternatives with Women for a New Era (DAWN) and the Women’s Working Group on Financing for Development is part of a series of action-oriented dialogues on the macro agendas and the current crises: Macro Solutions for Women, the People and the Planet.

Wednesday, 29 July 2020 @ 9 am NY/ 10 am Montevideo/ 2 pm London/ 15 hrs Brussels/ 16 hrs Nairobi/ 20 hrs Bangkok

Speakers:

Corina Rodriguez, Executive Committee Member, DAWN

Shahra Razavi, Director, Social Protection Department, International Labour Organisation

Laura Alfers, Director, Social Protection Programme, Women in Informal Employment: Globalizing and Organizing (WIEGO)

Concept Note

The COVID-19 Pandemic has starkly exposed the multiple inequalities that are intertwined in the world of work. First, it has forcefully revealed something that feminists have been repeating for a long time: the role of care is central  to sustain life in our societies. In a context of a health crisis,  where “staying at home” is one of the main strategies to face the emergency, care arrangements  have become more complex while  sexual division of labor continues to weight on women. Furthermore, there is an added pressure in the form of forced teleworking, which leads to situations where the boundaries between paid work and unpaid care work become blurred, working conditions become precarious and rights are easily violated.

Secondly, those in the informal economy bear heavier burdens in this crisis. Not working and staying at home has meant losing jobs and  livelihoods for the majority of informal workers and their families. Physical distancing is difficult to apply to those working in public spaces, such as street or market vendors, paid domestic workers or others in manufacturing or retail trade. The majority of workers in the informal economy are having less access to income resulting in increasing poverty and plunging workers and households into more precarious living conditions. The dimensions of this crisis are severe: The International Labour Organisation (ILO) reported that informal workers in Asia and Latin America endured an income decline of 81 percent during the first month of lock-downs. The situation of migrant workers has been particularly affected, given the higher exposure to occupational health and safety risks, no appropriate protection, exclusion from social protection measures directed towards nationals, as well as the restriction of movement and the accelerated destruction of jobs.

The context has also exposed the weakness of social protection systems to deal with the situation, and in most cases the applied immediate public policy responses have been insufficient.

Third, in the current context, it is important to analyse those groups of workers that are exposed in a differentiated form. On the one side are those in “front-line” jobs: health workers, workers at essential retail shops, paid domestic workers. The “front-line” is a predominantly feminized “front-line” workforce. In tandem, workers in platform jobs, many of which have seen an increase in the demand for their services but also higher levels of exploitation of their working conditions.

While some countries and some working sectors are coping more successfully with the emergency situation, most, especially those countries in the Global South, face a more serious form of exploitation already imposed by the pre-existing global financial capitalist model.

Can the harshness of the exposure of deepening inequalities serve as a spark to ignite and accelerate processes of transformation towards a “new normal” that is indeed new and different from the old normality? What feminist strategies can we draw on to activate an agenda of transformation in the world of work that serves women, people and the planet? What new challenges do we face and how should we adapt our analysis, our advocacy, our activism? What space can we create so that the post-COVID-19 pandemic does not continue to be a capitalist pandemic?

This webinar aims at reflecting on these questions and will be organized with four 10-12 minutes presentations, followed by a session of Q&A.

Objectives

  • To draw key elements of the agenda of transformation in the world of work from a feminist perspective;
  • To Identify common strategies across movements working on informal economy, care and work with different groups and constituencies (migrants, domestic workers, grassroots women, rural women, women in health sector);
  • To map advocacy spaces and mechanisms within the UN that may be used to activate our agenda of transformation of the world of work;
  • Facilitate cross-movement building and solidarity among civil society groups and activists mobilizing for care, workers rights, gender equality.
DAWN is a network of feminist scholars, researchers and activists from the economic South working for economic and gender justice and sustainable and democratic development. DAWN promotes critical analysis on global issues (economic, social and political) affecting the livelihoods, living standards, rights and development prospects of women, especially poor and marginalized women, in regions of the South. DAWN seeks to support women’s mobilization within civil society to challenge inequitable social, economic and political relations at global, regional and national levels, and to advance feminist alternatives.

The Women’s Working Group on Financing for Development (WWG on FfD) is an alliance of women’s organizations and networks who advocate for the advancement of women’s human rights and gender equality in the Financing for Development related UN processes.

Co-Conveners:

Rosa Lizarde, Global Director, Feminist Task Force; rosa.lizarde@feministtaskforce.org  

Emilia Reyes, Program Director, Policies & Budgets for Equality & Sustainable Development, Gender Equity: Citizenship, Work & Family; emilia@equidad.org.mx

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Vienna, please visit ngocswvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Geneva, please visit ngocsw-geneva.ch. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-NY, please visit ngocsw.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org.

[Interactive Webinar] Radical Inclusion for Advancing Social Justice: LGBTQ Human Rights in the Caribbean

Radical Inclusion for Advancing Social Justice: LGBTQ Human Rights in the Caribbean

An interactive webinar organized by PCI Media

Wednesday, July 22, 2020
12:00 PM EST

Register now: docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSfe4C_1nasrkr55HuslN6LzDx8hb-OLY8WydmGgfbC_m9Lbpg/viewform

Sustainable social justice movements require organization, creativity, and participation from all levels of society.

Join PCI Media’s President, Meesha Brown, and Bennet Charles, Communications Officer, in a discussion about the importance of authentic partnerships in advancing human rights for the LGBTQ community. The webinar will focus on the One Community Many Voices program in the Eastern Caribbean Region.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on UN efforts to combat discrimination based on sexual orientation and gender identity, please write to the Office of the High Commissioner on Human Rights at LGBTHumanRights@un.org and visit its website here.

Nelson Mandela International Day

https://www.un.org/pga/74/event/nelson-mandela-international-day/

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