pollution

[UNCTAD Seminar] Building Economic Resilience in Small Island Developing States

UNCTAD and the Commonwealth Secretariat will host an online seminar on “Building economic resilience in small island developing States” on 4 March 2021, from 3 to 5 p.m. CET.

Register here!

Background

The coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has exacerbated the significant vulnerability of small island developing States to external shocks and has unleashed an unprecedented socioeconomic and financial crisis. The pandemic has also compounded the lingering effects of the financial crisis of 2008/09, following which many small island developing States borrowed to underwrite deficit spending and spur economic growth. Already burdened with high debt service costs at the start of the pandemic, many small island developing States lack the fiscal space to respond to the extraordinary needs created by the pandemic.

To break this cycle of recurring crises and incomplete recoveries, small island developing States strive to build their resilience to environmental and economic shocks. In support of this important quest, in 2014, member States, in the SIDS Accelerated Modalities of Action (SAMOA) Pathway, reaffirmed their “commitment to take urgent and concrete action to address the vulnerability of small island developing States”, taking into account their “individual country circumstances”. Economic development strategies provide a blueprint for Governments and incentives for the private sector to invest in new industries and infrastructure, ideally spurring a cycle of economic growth and structural transformation, towards a resilient economy and sustainable long-term development. In this context, UNCTAD and the Commonwealth Secretariat will hold this seminar for member States on building economic resilience in small island developing States, to present their ongoing work and exchange views with member States on alternative development strategies for small island developing States and other small States.

The specific objectives of the seminar are to:

Inform SIDS and small States of assistance provided by UNCTAD and the Commonwealth; Foster debate on “alternative development strategies for diverse SIDS” based on joint UNCTAD-Commonwealth research; and Identify next steps, including further research, policy analysis and technical assistance.

Speakers:

  • Mr. Paul Akiwumi Director, Division for Africa, LDCs and Special Programmes (ALDC), UNCTAD
  • Dr. Arjoon Suddhoo Deputy Secretary-General, Commonwealth Secretariat
  • HE Mr. Chad Blackman PR of Barbados to the UN in Geneva Coordinator of the SIDS Group in Geneva
  • Mr. Pierre Encontre Chief, SIDS and Status Issues Section, UNCTAD
  • Dr. Ruth Kattumuri Senior Director, Economic, Youth & Sustainable Development Directorate, Commonwealth Secretariat
  • Mr. Kris Terauds Economist, SIDS and Status Issues Section, UNCTAD
  • Mr. Paul Akiwumi UNCTAD

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org.

World Wildlife Day

The animals and plants that live in the wild have an intrinsic value and contribute to the ecological, genetic, social, economic, scientific, educational, cultural, recreational and aesthetic aspects of human well-being and to sustainable development.

World Wildlife Day is an opportunity to celebrate the many beautiful and varied forms of wild fauna and flora and to raise awareness of the multitude of benefits that their conservation provides to people. At the same time, the Day reminds us of the urgent need to step up the fight against wildlife crime and human-induced reduction of species, which have wide-ranging economic, environmental and social impacts. Given these various negative effects, Sustainable Development Goal 15 focuses on halting biodiversity loss.

Read more about why the UN commemorates World Wildlife Day and how to get involved here.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org.

[Monthly Meeting] Climate Working Group of the Committee on Religious NGOs at the UN

The Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations (CRNGO) will convene the monthly virtual meeting of its Climate Working Group on Monday, March 1, at 10:00 am EST.

Join Zoom Meeting:
https://bic-org.zoom.us/j/94974579057?pwd=WENDQmlqdUJibnNTNE5XZHM3MkJqZz09

(ID: 94974579057, passcode: 8JuE2k)

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values, and Global Concerns-NY, please visit csvgc-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org.

Economist Group’s 8th Annual World Ocean Summit: Accelerating a Sustainable Ocean Economy

Since 2012 The Economist‘s World Ocean Summit has been the pre-eminent global platform for leaders in business, finance, government, and civil society to debate the greatest challenges facing the seas, share bold strategies to help tackle them, and form partnerships that will mobilize the action needed to build a sustainable ocean economy.

The 2020 “ocean super year”, of a series of major conferences and events, was disrupted by the pandemic. In 2021 it will therefore be an even more urgent move from theory to action.

The 8th annual edition, now a fully virtual event, will aim to change the way business is done in the ocean, shaping and accelerating how governments, businesses, and civil society work together to create a sustainable blue economy.

The virtual week offers the opportunity to access five days of highly curated content and the chance to make meaningful connections no matter where you are in the world.

Plenary sessions and action-oriented industry tracks include: Aquaculture, Energy, Plastics, Fishing, Shipping, and Tourism.

Register here and explore the full agenda here

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-New York, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org

Rare Disease Day 2021

Rare Disease Day takes place on the last day of February each year. The main objective of Rare Disease Day is to raise awareness amongst the general public and decision-makers about rare diseases and their impact on patients’ lives.

The campaign targets primarily the general public and also seeks to raise awareness amongst policy makers, public authorities, industry representatives, researchers, health professionals and anyone who has a genuine interest in rare diseases.

Explore and participate in events happening around the world in honor of Rare Disease Day here!

The official Rare Disease Day 2021 video is available in 36 languages, kicking off the international patient-led movement that puts rare diseases in the spotlight. 6 continents, 6 portraits, 6 heroes, 6 lives. The official Rare Disease Day video shines a light on the global and wide community of 300 million people and over 6000 rare diseases.

What are Rare Diseases?

There are over 300 million people living with one or more of over 6,000 identified rare diseases around the world1, each supported by family, friends and a team of carers that make up the rare disease community.

Each rare disease may only affect a handful of people, scattered around the world, but taken together the number of people directly affected is equivalent to the population of the world’s third largest country.

Rare diseases currently affect 3.5% – 5.9% of the worldwide population.

72% of rare diseases are genetic whilst others are the result of infections (bacterial or viral), allergies and environmental causes, or are degenerative and proliferative. 70% of those genetic rare diseases start in childhood. A disease defined as rare in Europe when it affects fewer than 1 in 2,000 people.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee for Rare Diseases, please visit ngocommitteerarediseases.org

Launch of FACTI Panel Final Report

The FACTI Panel is the High Level Panel on International Financial Accountability, Transparency and Integrity for Achieving the 2030 Agenda. It aims to improve the world’s chances of achieving sustainable development by making recommendations that both strengthen current efforts to combat illicit financial flows, and close remaining gaps in the international system.

The FACTI Panel is set to launch its final report at 8:00-10:30 (EST) on Thursday, 25 February 2021. The event will be conducted virtually with simultaneous interpretation for all UN official languages.

All interested participants can register by clicking the registration link below and filling out the form. After registering the FACTI Panel Secretariat will directly send you connection details to attend the launch.

Register here.

Read the FACTI Panel interim report here.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-New York, please visit ngocsd-ny.org.

[NGO CSW-NY] Climate Crisis and Climate Action by and for Women

Climate change presents an unprecedented threat to economies and societies around the world.

The climate crisis burdens all of humanity, but not equally. The world’s poor, the majority of whom are women, are disproportionately affected. To advance workable and equitable solutions on the local, national, and global level, women must continue to serve as change agents – agents of mitigation, adaptation, and prevention of the most serious consequences of climate change.

NGO CSW/NY’s monthly meeting will examine the international situation and map a few examples of solutions that have proven to be successful.

Agenda:

1 – 1:30PM: NGO CSW65 Virtual Forum Updates
Updates from Houry Geudelekian, NGO CSW/NY Chair

1:30 – 3PM: Program
Panel: Moderated by Azadeh Khalili, NGO CSW/NY Communications Secretary

  • Osprey Orielle LakeExecutive Director of WECAN International
  • Mara Dolan, Women’s Environment and Development Organization
  • Divya Mathew, Women Deliver

Small Group Discussions

Closing

Register here!

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-NY, please visit ngocsw.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Geneva, please visit ngocsw-geneva.ch. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Vienna, please visit ngocswvienna.org.

ESD and Climate Emergency: Bend the curve for climate change

UNESCO World Conference on Education for Sustainable Development – Pre-conference workshops

Since COVID-19 outbreak, the world’s attention has been focused on the pandemic and the coordination of the emergency response to the crisis. Meanwhile, major sustainable development challenges, including the greatest challenge of our times – climate change – remain unresolved.

Human activities such as burning fossil fuels, cutting down rainforests and farming livestock are responsible for the rise of the earth’s temperature. The only way to counter climate change is to transform our lifestyles and establish sustainable patterns of consumption and production worldwide.

Education has been recognized as a crucial element to counter climate change and is one of the priority areas of Action for Climate Empowerment (ACE) because it has the power to transform the way people feel, think and behave. Education contributes to raising awareness on the physical mechanisms and the emergency of climate change and its impacts. Education empowers people to take action by promoting values, problem solving and critical thinking skills.

But, concretely, how can this happen? How can Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) contribute to urgent action for green and sustainable societies in light of the climate emergency?

This workshop will raise the parallels between the pandemic and climate emergency and discuss how the lessons learned from the public response to the Covid-19 crisis can help ‘flatten the curve of climate change,’ in particular through ESD’s contribution. This installment will also address the aforementioned question looking at examples from youth action and from formal education, and will review some recent data.

Register here: https://unesco-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_C482BnaSQVWNpW5f5EYIRQ

Read more: https://en.unesco.org/themes/education-sustainable-development/ESDfor2030-workshops

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

[UN observance] World Pulses Day

Each year on February 10, the United Nations commemorates World Pulses Day. “Pulses, also known as legumes, are the edible seeds of leguminous plants cultivated for food. Dried beans, lentils and peas are the most commonly known and consumed types of pulses.

The nitrogen-fixing properties of pulses improve soil fertility, which increases and extends the productivity of the farmland. By using pulses for intercropping and cover crops, farmers can also promote farm biodiversity and soil biodiversity, while keeping harmful pests and diseases at bay.

Furthermore, pulses can contribute to climate change mitigation by reducing dependence on the synthetic fertilizers used to introduce nitrogen artificially into the soil. Greenhouse gases are released during the manufacturing and application of these fertilizers, and their overuse can be detrimental to the environment. Recognizing their value, on 20 December 2013, the UN General Assembly adopted a resolution (A/RES/68/231) proclaiming 2016 as the International Year of Pulses (IYP). The celebration of the year, led by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), increased the public awareness of the nutritional and environmental benefits of pulses as part of sustainable food production.” – un.org

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bknotts@uua.org or bobbinassar@gmail.com.

[Book Launch] “Critical reflections on Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs)”

You are invited to the online launch of the book entitled “Critical reflections on Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs)”, edited by Jasmine Gideon (Birkbeck Geography Department) and Elaine Unterhalter (Institute of Education, University of London). The session will take place on Friday 5th February from 2:30 PM – 4:15 PM CET.

The studies in this newly-published book argue that despite the hype within many policy circles, there is little evidence to support the presumed benefits of PPPs in reducing poverty and addressing inequalities in the provision of and access to public services. The book adopts a cross-sectoral comparative approach to investigate how PPPs have played out in practice, and what the implications have been for inequalities. Participants at the session will be commenting on the issues raised in the book, notably the implications of the growing reliance of PPPs as a means of funding and delivering key services, and what this means for inequalities.

Speakers will be: 

-Philip Alston – Director and Chair of the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice, and former UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights (2014-2020).

-Rama Baru – Professor at the Centre of Social Medicine and Community Health, Jawaharlal Nehru University.

-Sonia Languille – Acting Co-Director of the Higher Education Support Program at the Open Society Foundations, and research fellow at the Centre for Education and International Development at the Institute of Education (University of London).

-Jasmine Gideon – Reader in Gender, Health, and International Development in the Department of Geography, Birkbeck, University of London.

-Elaine Unterhalter – Professor of Education & International Development at University College London, Institute of Education and Co-Director of CEID.

-María José Romero – PhD candidate in Development Economics at SOAS University of London, and policy and advocacy manager at Eurodad

Online registration is mandatory: https://lshtm.zoom.us/meeting/register/tJIof-6tpzoqHNw5qh63BP-4GbixY5431aMH (but the event is open for everyone!)

There is also a 30% discount code for the book included in this link: https://lidc.ac.uk/event/book-launch-critical-reflections-on-public-private-partnerships/

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org

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