fishing

World Maritime Day: Seafarers at the core of shipping’s future

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the professionalism and sacrifice of the two million seafarers who serve on the world’s merchant fleet. Shipping has continued to transport more than 80% of world trade, including vital medical supplies, food and other basic goods that are critical for the COVID-19 response and recovery – but hundreds of thousands of seafarers face a humanitarian crisis as they have been stranded at sea, unable to get off the ships they operate with contracts extended by many months. This needs to be addressed urgently, through Governments designating seafarers as essential workers and ensuring safe crew changes can take place.

The theme for this year, “Seafarers at the core of shipping’s future,” reflects a clear need to raise awareness of seafarersʹ crucial role in world trade and increase their visibility. As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, the crew change crisis in 2020 has highlighted seafarersʹ exceptional contribution as key and essential workers on the front line of delivering vital goods through a pandemic and in ordinary times. The international community has seen how the ability for shipping services and seafarers to ensure the functioning of the global supply chains has been central to responding to, and eventually overcoming, this pandemic. This could not happen without the professionalism and dedication of the world’s seafarers.

The World Maritime theme for 2021 will provide the opportunity to focus on seafarers as the people at the heart of shipping, while also allowing for activities to delve into specific topics relevant to the role of the seafarer in safety, maritime security, environmental protection and seafarersʹ well-being; and the future of seafaring against a backdrop of increased digitalization and automation. The theme also links to the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), particularly SDG 4 on education and training; SDG 8 related to decent work; SDG 9 on innovation and industry, which links to the promotion of a resilient maritime sector; and SDG 5 on gender equality, linked to efforts to promote seafaring as a career for all, including women, in particular.

To learn more about the IMO, the United Nations Law of the Sea Convention, and why/how the UN commemorates World Maritime Day, please visit un.org/en/observances/maritime-day.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit congocsd.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com

World Water Day

World Water Day, held on 22 March every year since 1993, focuses on the importance of freshwater.

World Water Day celebrates water and raises awareness of the 2.2 billion people living without access to safe water. It is about taking action to tackle the global water crisis. A core focus of World Water Day is to support the achievement of Sustainable Development Goal 6: water and sanitation for all by 2030.

View the 2021 World Water Day toolkit and explore this year’s slated events here. All are welcome to participate!

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP

Economist Group’s 8th Annual World Ocean Summit: Accelerating a Sustainable Ocean Economy

Since 2012 The Economist‘s World Ocean Summit has been the pre-eminent global platform for leaders in business, finance, government, and civil society to debate the greatest challenges facing the seas, share bold strategies to help tackle them, and form partnerships that will mobilize the action needed to build a sustainable ocean economy.

The 2020 “ocean super year”, of a series of major conferences and events, was disrupted by the pandemic. In 2021 it will therefore be an even more urgent move from theory to action.

The 8th annual edition, now a fully virtual event, will aim to change the way business is done in the ocean, shaping and accelerating how governments, businesses, and civil society work together to create a sustainable blue economy.

The virtual week offers the opportunity to access five days of highly curated content and the chance to make meaningful connections no matter where you are in the world.

Plenary sessions and action-oriented industry tracks include: Aquaculture, Energy, Plastics, Fishing, Shipping, and Tourism.

Register here and explore the full agenda here

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-New York, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org