cultural genocide

NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples [monthly meeting]

Hello Dear Friends,

Please find below the Zoom link for the next regular monthly meeting of the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which will take place on September 15th from 1 pm to 3 pm. We look forward to seeing everyone and thank you for your support and dedication to the committee.

Join Zoom Meeting:https://fordham.zoom.us/j/82417133037Meeting ID: 824 1713 3037Join by SIP: 82417133037@zoomcrc.comJoin by H.323:

162.255.37.11 (US West)162.255.36.11 (US East)115.114.131.7 (India Mumbai)115.114.115.7 (India Hyderabad)213.19.144.110 (Amsterdam Netherlands)213.244.140.110 (Germany)103.122.166.55 (Australia Sydney)103.122.167.55 (Australia Melbourne)149.137.40.110 (Singapore)64.211.144.160 (Brazil)149.137.68.253 (Mexico)69.174.57.160 (Canada Toronto)65.39.152.160 (Canada Vancouver)207.226.132.110 (Japan Tokyo)149.137.24.110 (Japan Osaka)

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CoNGO Notes: The NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a Substantive Committee of the Conference of NGOs in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations.

2022 International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples: The Role of Indigenous Women in the Preservation and Transmission of Traditional Knowledge

The International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples is celebrated globally on 9 August. It marks the date of the inaugural session of the Working Group on Indigenous Populations in 1982. The Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA) is organizing a virtual commemoration of the International Day from 9 am to 11am (EST) on Tuesday, 9 August 2022, focusing on this year’s theme: “The Role of Indigenous Women in the Preservation and Transmission of Traditional Knowledge. ” Indigenous Peoples, Member States, UN entities, civil society, and the public are all invited.

Background:

Indigenous women are the backbone of indigenous peoples’ communities and play a crucial role in the preservation and transmission of traditional ancestral knowledge. They have an integral collective and community role as carers of natural resources and keepers of scientific knowledge. Many indigenous women are also taking the lead in the defence of lands and territories and advocating for indigenous peoples’ collective rights worldwide.

The significance of indigenous peoples’ traditional knowledge is widely acknowledged: “Long before the development of modern science, which is quite young, indigenous peoples have developed their ways of knowing how to survive and also of ideas about meanings, purposes and values.” As noted by the Special Rapporteur on Indigenous Peoples, the term “scientific knowledge” is also used to underscore that traditional knowledge is contemporary and dynamic, and of equal value to other kinds of knowledge.

International consultations jointly facilitated by UNESCO and the Internal Council of Science (ICSU) states that “Traditional knowledge is a cumulative body of knowledge, know-how, practices and representations maintained and developed by peoples with extended histories of interaction with the natural environment. These sophisticated sets of understandings, interpretations and meanings are part and parcel of a cultural complex that encompasses language, naming and classification systems, resource use practices, ritual, spirituality and worldviews.”

However, despite the crucial role that indigenous women play in their communities as breadwinners, caretakers, knowledge keepers, leaders and human rights defenders, they often suffer from intersecting levels of discrimination on the basis of gender, class, ethnicity and socioeconomic status. Their right to self-determination, self-governance and control of resources and ancestral lands have been violated over centuries.

Small but significant progress has been made by indigenous women in decision-making processes in some communities. They are leaders at local and national levels, and stand at the frontlines of defending their lands, their cultures, and their communities. The reality, however, remains that indigenous women are widely under-represented, disproportionately negatively affected by decisions made on their behalf, and are too frequently the victims of multiple expressions of discrimination and violence.

The Committee of the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women (CEDAW) highlighted some of the major issues encountered by indigenous women, particularly noting the high levels of poverty; low levels of education and illiteracy; limitations in access to health, basic sanitation, credit and employment; limited participation in political life; and the prevalence of domestic and sexual violence.

Format:

The virtual commemoration will include an interactive dialogue segment with invited speakers, moderated by Ms. Rosemary Lane, Acting Chief of the Indigenous Peoples Development Branch – Secretariat of the Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues. Speakers will share their expertise and experience from their indigenous communities in preserving, reviving, retaining, and transmitting the traditional ancestral knowledge in various fields of communal activities, including but not limited to effective and sustainable climate solutions, use of natural resources, protection of biodiversity, ensuring food security, promoting native languages and culture, and managing indigenous science and medicine. Questions to be discussed include:

  • What is the unique position of indigenous women in the preservation and transmission of traditional knowledge?
  • What are some of the brightest examples of indigenous women-led processes in solving contemporary global issues through the effective application of traditional scientific knowledge?
  • How are indigenous languages crucial to the development, preservation, and transmission of indigenous cultural and knowledge systems? How are women leading the way in maintaining indigenous languages?
  • What was the effect of applying indigenous scientific knowledge and medicine in alleviating the consequences of the COVID-19 epidemiologic crisis?

Panel Speakers:

Archana Soreng (Kharia) – Member of UN Secretary-General’s Youth Advisory Group on Climate Change

Aili Keskitalo (Sámi)  – Former President of the Sámi Parliament of Norway

Zakiyatou Oualet Halatine (Touareg) – Former Minister of Tourism & Handicrafts, Mali

Hannah McGlade (Noongar) – Member of the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues

Commentary on Panel Discussion by His Excellency Ambassador Diego Pary Rodriguez(Quechua), Permanent Representative of Bolivia to the United Nations

 

More information about International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples 2022 available here: un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/international-day-of-the-worlds-indigenous-peoples-2022.html

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-NY, please visit ngocsw.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Vienna, please visit  ngocswvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Geneva, please visit ngocsw-geneva.ch. For more information on the NGO Committee on Language and Languages, please email the co-chairs at fmhult@umbc.edu or tonkin@hartford.edu. 

Two years after the death of George Floyd: Antiracism, #BLM and the United Nations

As people continue to challenge the systemic racism that has devalued the lives of Black and Brown people globally, many are asking the question: why do some of these tragic events spark a stronger call for change than others?

Floyds murder also revived the concept of antiracism. The webinar will explore, in practice, what it means to be antiracist. Participants will also be invited to reflect on the role played by Christian nationalism in reinforcing white supremacy and racial subjugation, thereby fueling racism, xenophobia and racial discrimination.

As a follow up of its 1 June 2021 webinar marking the 100th anniversary of the Tulsa Race Massacre, the World Council of Churches Commission of the Churches on International Affairs will host this webinar on the sides of the 30th session of the UN Working Group of Experts on People of African Descent, which will be taking place in New York city, USA, from 23 to 27 May 2022.

Speakers:

Moderator: Rev. Chebon Kernell, ordained elder in the Oklahoma Indian Missionary Conference

  • Gaynel D. Curry, member of the United Nations Permanent Forum on People of African Descent
  • Rt. Rev. Elizabeth A. Eaton, presiding bishop of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
  • Rev. Dr. Leah Gunning Francis, vice president for Academic Affairs and dean of the Faculty at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis
  • Prof. Gay McDougall, member of the United Nations Committee for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)

Register here to join this webinar live on Wednesday, 25 May, 3:30 pm CEST / 9:30am EST.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@yahoo.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

Criminalising Ecocide: A New Deterrent to Crimes that Affect the Environment

You’re invited to this important side event of the 31st Session of the Commission on Crime Prevention & Criminal Justice (CCPCJ)!

Register here: unodc.org/unodc/en/commissions/CCPCJ/session/31_Session_2022/registration.html

The regular thirty-first session of the Commission on Crime Prevention and Criminal Justice is scheduled for 16-20 May 2022. The provisional annotated agenda will be published on the website of the Commission following the present arrangements. The present proposed organizational arrangements were drafted in response to the recent
developments of the COVID-19 pandemic, taking into consideration the regulations by the host country, Austria, and the guidelines of the Vienna International Centre. Based on the developments of the global health situation and to possible changes to the regulations by the host Country Austria, arrangements may be revised closer to the regular session.

Organization Format
The sessions will be conducted in a hybrid format, in the M-building of the Vienna International Centre. The meetings of the plenary and COW will be held in parallel. The plenary meetings will be held in the plenary hall of the M-building. The meetings of the COW will be held in Boardroom A.

In-person participation will be possible for a limited number of delegates from United Nations Member States, UN Entities, IGOs and NGOs in consultative status with ECOSOC. Due to COVID-requirements the number of seats in the room is limited and as such only a limited number of in-person participants can join. In-person participants are required to confirm adherence to relevant provisions contained in the COVID guidelines for participants and are expected to provide supporting documents as necessary.

Participation In line with the Rules of Procedure of the Functional Commissions of ECOSOC, Member States, as well as representatives of UN Entities, IGOs and NGOs in consultative status with ECOSOC can participate in the session.

More information about this specific side event, and the full schedule of events, will be provided here at a later stage: unodc.org/unodc/en/commissions/CCPCJ/session/31_Session_2022/session-31-of-the-ccpcj.html

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CoNGO Notes: The NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna is a Substantive Committee of the Conference of NGOs in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations. Likewise, for more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-New York, please visit . For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com.

Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues (UNPFII)

Theme: Indigenous peoples, business, autonomy and the human rights principles of due diligence including free, prior and informed consent

Date: 25 April – 6 May 2022

Location: United Nations Headquarters, New York + online

The 2022 session of the Permanent Forum will be open to in-person and online participation. Each organization may register a maximum of three individuals.  Pre-registration is required for all in-person and online participants.  See information below about registration.

Note that all open meetings of the Forum will be streamed at webtv.un.org.  Viewing the live stream will not require any registration.

Side event listings: un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples/wp-content/uploads/sites/19/2022/04/Side-event-list-to-be-published-26-April.pdf

More info: un.org/development/desa/indigenouspeoples

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CoNGO Notes: The NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples is a Substantive Committee of the Conference of NGOs in Consultative Relationship with the United Nations.