forced migration

Regular Pathways and Irregular Migration

Join GRFDT in the second round of virtual meetings, this one focused on “Regular Pathways and Irregular Migration.” This round will build on the action points from the first round. A moderator will guide the 90-minute open conversations and will go around the regions to collect participants’ insights.

Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMkce6grjsrHtVe4SfYkG-gUWPFyW72hYo3

Recognize that in the absence of adequate, rights-respecting regular migration pathways, people who need to move for livelihood or other reasons will still do so and must not be criminalized for it.

Moderator: Mr. Oscar A. Chacon – Executive Director, Alianza Americas

Action Points:

1. Change the narratives – towards a reconceptualization approach

2. Unpack irregular migration into different thematics (intersectionality)

3. Pushing for the principle of non-discrimination

4. Moving forward with a multilateral approach

5. Family reunification

6. Temporary labour migration

7. Regular pathways and climate change

The Organizers: Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA), the Cross-Regional Center for Refugees and Migrants (CCRM), the Global Research Forum on Diaspora and Transnationalism (GRFDT), the Civil Society Action CommitteeAlianza Americas, the Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants (PICUM), and the Climate Migration & Displacement Platform (CMDP)

Simultaneous interpretation in Arabic, English, French, & Spanish

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@gmail.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

World Refugee Day

World Refugee Day 2021 focuses on the power of inclusion.

The shared experience of COVID-19 has showed us that we only succeed if we stand together. We have all had to do our part to keep each other safe and despite the challenges, refugees and displaced people have stepped up.

Given the chance, refugees will continue to contribute to a stronger, safer and more vibrant world. Therefore UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency’s World Refugee Day campaign this year is calling for the greater inclusion of refugees in health systems, schools and sport. Only by working together can we recover from the pandemic. Together we heal, learn and shine.

Background

Every minute 20 people leave everything behind to escape war, persecution or terror. There are several types of forcibly displaced persons:

Refugees

  • A refugee is someone who fled his or her home and country owing to “a well-founded fear of persecution because of his/her race, religion, nationality, membership in a particular social group, or political opinion”, according to the United Nations 1951 Refugee Convention. Many refugees are in exile to escape the effects of natural or human-made disasters.

Asylum Seekers

  • Asylum seekers say they are refugees and have fled their homes as refugees do, but their claim to refugee status is not yet definitively evaluated in the country to which they fled.

Internally Displaced Persons

  • Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) are people who have not crossed an international border but have moved to a different region than the one they call home within their own country.

Stateless Persons

  • Stateless persons do not have a recognized nationality and do not belong to any country. Statelessness situations are usually caused by discrimination against certain groups. Their lack of identification — a citizenship certificate — can exclude them from access to important government services, including health care, education or employment.

Returnees

  • Returnees are former refugees who return to their own countries or regions of origin after time in exile. Returnees need continuous support and reintegration assistance to ensure that they can rebuild their lives at home.

To learn more about how/why the UN commemorates this observance, including how the 1951 Refugee Convention and its 1967 Protocol helps protect refugees, explore un.org/en/observances/refugee-day.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@gmail.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

[UN Observance] International Migrants Day

Every year on December 18, the United Nations commemorates International Migrants Day. To learn more and stay apprised of relevant events, visit https://www.un.org/en/observances/migrants-day.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of the Child, please email the co-chair at marjones@nyc.rr.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN. For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development-NY, please visit https://ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org

Families Coping with COVID: Challenges and Opportunities in Child Welfare

Families Coping with COVID: Challenges & Opportunities in Child Welfare
Please RSVP by 6pm EST Wednesday, Nov. 18th, via this form.
Families around the world are struggling with the added pressures of the COVID-19 health crisis due to the effects of job losses, changes in schooling, and affected family members, especially those which are vulnerable. For families involved in child welfare proceedings, there is an additional risk of prolonging family separation between children and parents who are capable but may need additional support. We are pleased to host Prof. Jane Spinak of Columbia University School of Law , who examines this in “Child Welfare and COVID-19: An Unexpected Opportunity for Systemic Change,” in Law in the Time of COVID-19. Prof Spinak will discuss the impact of covid on child welfare systems and ways in which it may spur reforms which will benefit children and families.
Note: If you were not able to attend our October members meeting, or would like to revisit the excellent remarks of our speakers, the recording is available on our YouTube  channel.
NGO Committee on the Family New York
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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Family, visit www.ngofamilyny.org. For information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of the Child, please email the co-chair at marjones@nyc.rr.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

World Refugee Day: Every Action Counts

In recognition of World Refugee Day and in collaboration with UNHCR, the UN Refugee Agency, this event will feature stories from a variety of perspectives within the refugee realm.

Bear witness to the daily struggle of refugees from a UNHCR field worker; be inspired by a refugee resettled in the United States where s/he joined the fight against COVID-19 in his/her new community; and hear from Chris Boian, UNHCR spokesperson, who can offer additional glimpses of the work to provide dignity, hope, and new beginnings to refugees around the world. Audience members will have the opportunity to pose questions to each of the storytellers during a question and answer session.

To register:

https://unfoundation.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_wYIfk3yDRCWxmi7jrrC3GQ?emci=4ae59e55-a5a9-ea11-9b05-00155d039e74&emdi=88d4db6b-cea9-ea11-9b05-00155d039e74&ceid=4662570