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The Climate Crisis and Developing Economies: A conversation with the Director of Power Shift Africa

WHAT THE WEST OWES THE REST

The Climate Crisis & Developing Economies: A conversation with Mohamed Adow, Director of Power Shift Africa

President Biden has ushered in the most ambitious climate plan in US history. But his wafer-slim majority in Congress gives him little time to push through his agenda before midterm elections in 18 months. The faith community must push for the realization of scaled up US climate ambition in coming months and years, following COP26 in November and in preparation for decisive 2024 Presidential elections.

Mohamed Adow is an international climate policy expert and ardent advocate for the people of developing nations – who are disproportionately affected by climate change but play almost no role in causing it. Hailing from a pastoralist community in Northern Kenya that faces increasing droughts, Adow’s experience on the frontlines of the climate crisis anchor his work as a voice for those most vulnerable to climate change. He is an outspoken and deeply respected leader among policy makers, NGOs, and the media on Africa and climate justice.

Mohamed is the Founder and Director of Power Shift Africa, a nongovernmental organization and thinktank based in Kenya that he formed in 2018 to mobilize climate action in Africa and shift climate and energy policies to zero carbon.

Join the event here: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/86137939600?from=addon#success

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP.

Remarkable Women, Powerful Stories

Join Zonta each month to hear a remarkable woman share her achievements and personal story as part of our Remarkable Women, Powerful Stories Leadership Series.

In May, Zonta is pleased to welcome Kendra Sharp, a Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Oregon State University (OSU), currently on loan to the U.S. National Science Foundation where she has been serving as the Head of the Office of International Science and Engineering since February 2021.

Register here!

Learn more about Kendra at https://www.zonta.org/RemarkableWomenPowerfulStories.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-NY, please visit ngocsw.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Geneva, please visit ngocsw-geneva.ch. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Status of Women-Vienna, please visit ngocswvienna.org.

International Week of Solidarity with People of Non-Self-Governing Territories

In the UN Charter, a Non-Self-Governing Territory is defined as a Territory “whose people have not yet attained a full measure of self-government.”

In 1946, several UN Member States identified a number of Territories under their administration that were not self-governing and placed them on a UN list. Countries administering Non-Self-Governing Territories are called administering Powers.  As a result of the decolonization process over the years, most of the Territories were removed from the list.

Chapter XI of the UN Charter – the Declaration regarding Non-Self-Governing Territories – provides that Member States administering Territories, which have not attained self-government recognize “that the interests of the inhabitants of these Territories are paramount” and accept as a “sacred trust” the obligation to promote their well-being.

Chapter IX urged the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable rights of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to their natural resources, including land, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources, and requested the Administering Powers to take all necessary steps to protect the property rights of the peoples of those Territories.

Administering Powers, in addition to ensuring the political, economic, social and educational advancement of the peoples, undertake to assist them in developing self-government and democratic political institutions. Administering Powers have an obligation to transmit regularly to the Secretary-General information on the economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories under their administration.

Chapter IX also urged all States, directly and through their action in the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, to provide moral and material assistance to the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.

To learn more about the history of this UN observance and view the UN’s educational videos on decolonization, visit un.org/en/observances/non-self-governing-week.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the Decolonization Alliance, please email lbautista@umcjustice.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com.

The Human Face of the Migration Crisis: A Faith-Based Response

The scale of human migration can be overwhelming—estimates are that more people are on the move in our time than at any time in human history. To each “number” there is a human face, a person made in the image of God.

How can people of faith respond to this crisis in tangible ways? How can the Bible inform our response? To look at these and other questions related to the migration crisis we will be joined by a panel from across North America with a variety of experiences and perspectives on migration.

Register here!

Speakers:

vănThanh Nguyễn, S.V.D., is the author of the new book What Does the Bible Say About Strangers, Migrants and Refugees?. Nguyễn came to the United States as a refugee from Vietnam in 1975 and he is today Professor of New Testament Studies and the holder of the Francis X. Ford, M.M., Chair of Catholic Missiology at Catholic Theological Union.

Dannia and Aida Pena were born in San Salvador, El Salvador. In the 1990s they fled the Civil War in El Salvador and came to Los Angeles, California. Today, Dannia serves as an Accounting Manager at a Mental Health Center in San Antonio and Aida works just outside San Antonio in Bilingual Education. Both sisters are married with children and are active in the Focolare Movement.

Sean Ryan and Monica Nugent are university students living in Vancouver, British Columbia. As an outgrowth of their Catholic faith, both are both active in Dignity Inherent, a group working to raise awareness about human trafficking and Canada’s laws on prostitution.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values, and Global Concerns-NY, please visit csvgc-ny.org.

Memorial and Celebration of the Life of Pamela Kraft

Dear friends,

Please join us for this special online event celebrating the life of our dear Pamela. She is being honored in this side event at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues – the global gathering of Indigenous Peoples at the UN that she so loved and participated in for decades, and for which Project Access prepared Indigenous Peoples.

The program will feature speakers, artistic presentations, and open sharing. Spanish and Portuguese interpretation will be available. Registration is not required to attend this virtual event. If necessary, you can use this time zone converter to see the time of the event in your time zone.

We hope to see you at this special event.

Best wishes,

Tribal Link’s staff and Board

Special note:

This has been one of the most difficult months in Tribal Link’s history, as we continue to mourn the passing of our inspirational founder and leader, Pamela Kraft. However, this has only strengthened our resolve to continue on with the crucial work of facilitating opportunities for Indigenous Peoples’ voices to be heard in international decision-making. With a record-breaking 1,400+ people already signing up for “Indigenous Peoples and the United Nations: Project Access Online,” we are sure that she is looking down on us, happy to see the fruits of her labor multiplying. We will continue to honor her legacy, as was her deepest wish.

Thank you all so much for your support during this time.  Should you wish to contribute to Tribal Link’s ongoing work, memorial contributions are still being accepted at Tribal Link’s donation page.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP.

Dialogue on Education: Meeting New Challenges

Education at all levels faced unforeseen challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic in communities, globally impacting students and educators along with their families.  Every aspect of education adjusted to ensure inclusive quality learning continued to be experienced by students with curriculums via virtual engagement which highlighted the importance of digital connectivity for all students. Education is covered in the UN 17 Sustainable Development Goals and is key to the success of the UN2030 Sustainable Development Agenda to “Leave No One Behind.” Our panel will share their reflections and innovative solutions in response to this global crisis. In addition, we will share an overview of our UN75 People’s Declaration for the UN We Need.

RSVP here

Welcome & Moderator

  • Ms. Margo LaZaro, President and Chair of the NGOCSD-NY; Co-Founder/CSO of the SDG Impact Awards Community, Director of UN Relations-Global Family, Coalition Partner of C4UNWN

Opening Address

  • H.E. Dr. Michal Mlynar, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of the Permanent Mission of Slovakia to the United Nations

Keynote Address

  • Mr. Ramu Damodaran, Chief, United Nations Academic Impact (UNAI) Outreach Division, United Nations Department of Global Communications

Meeting New Challenges

  • Dr. Miriam Westheimer, Chief Program Officer of HIPPY International
  • Ms. Carolina Andueza, Executive Director of CMPC Foundation & Director of HIPPY Chile
  • Ms. Judith Cunningham, Founder and CSO of Youth for a Better World-Montessori Model UN and Youth Impact Forum
  • Ms. Daria Kimuli, Co-Founder of the St. Philip Neri Primary School, Nairobi, Kenya
  • Mr. Steven Aiello, Founder and Director of Debate for Peace, Tel Aviv, Israel
  • Mr. Ameen Agbaria, 16 year-old, Youth Delegate of Debate for Peace, Palestinian citizen of Israel
  • Dr. Carrie Pemberton Ford, Executive Director CCARHT. Senior Fellow of Ethics and Public Life, Margaret Beaufort Institute,   University of Cambridge, UK
  • Ms. Marija Marinovic, Graduate Student of Criminology from the University of Cambridge, UK

Closing Reflections

  • Dr. Andrea Mlynarova, Lecturer of Mathematics at CUNY Baruch & Hunter College and President of the UN Delegations’ Women’s Club

C4UNWN & the UN75 People’s Declaration

  • Mr. Jeffery Huffines, Senior Advisor of the Coalition for the UN We Need and Together First

Interactive Dialogue Exchange

Special Student Greeting

  • Mr. Desderio Njiru, is the Head Teacher of St. Philip Neri Primary School, Nairobi, Kenya

Our Partners:

NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, Coalition for the UN We Need, SDG Relief Fund, Together First, SDG Impact Awards Community, HIPPY International, Global Family, Soroptimist International, World Federalist Movement-Canada, Humanitarian Focus Foundation, Salvation Army International Social Justice Commission, Consortium for Sustainable Urbanization, COVIDxNOW, Empower a Billion Women-EBW, Debate for Peace, Huairou Commission, Youth for a Better World:/Montessori Model UN, Youth Impact! Forum, General Assembly of Partners, NGO Major Group Urban Cluster, Global Family for Love & Peace, ICW, CoNGO, and UNA-USA Council of Organizations

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN. For more information on the NGO Committee on Children’s Rights, please visit childrightsny.org.

Some are Hazardous Environmental Legacy Sites, some are Monsters: Why sustainable development needs to include environmental crime

The Committee on Sustainable Development cordially invites its member organisations to a talk by Prof. Verena Winiwarter (BOKU) on Some are Hazardous Environmental Legacy Sites, some are Monsters: Why sustainable development needs to include environmental crime.

Time 6:30pm – 8:30pm (Vienna)/ 12:30 – 2:30pm EST

Zoom Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87097371746?pwd=SHp0b3ROWnlCSzZmMzJ6TlFmWU1PUT09

Meeting ID: 870 9737 1746       Kenncode: 240089

About Verena Winiwarter

Professor of Environmental History at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt since 2007, Verena Winiwarter transferred to BOKU 2018 with the Institute of Social Ecology. She holds a PhD in Environmental History (1998) and a venia legendi in Human Ecology (2003) from University of Vienna. Since 2016, she is a full member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OEAW), Chairperson of the Commission for Interdisciplinary Ecological Studies, and co-founded the European Society of Environmental History. Her main research interests comprise the history of landscapes, in particular rivers and the environmental history of soils and legacy sites. Her 2014 co-authored book “Umwelt hat Geschichte. Sechzig Reisen durch die Zeit” was elected as Wissenschaftsbuch des Jahres in Austria and Umweltbuch des Jahres in Germany and is now in its 3rd imprint. In 2013, she was „WissenschaftlerIn des Jahres“ in Austria and in December 2019 she was awarded the “Preis der Stadt Wien für Geisteswissenschaften”.

To register please send an e-mail to the secretary (ngocsd.vienna@gmail.com). We look forward to seeing you!

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com.

The Doctrine of Discovery and the Indigenous Ministries of The Episcopal Church

Dear UN partners and participants at the UN Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues 20th session, you are cordially invited to a panel discussion with Episcopal Indigenous participants in the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues 20.

At 2pm EST on Monday, April 26, join via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/j/99063295488?pwd=RERvMEptNTdoVE1tbFVlbTM0TVZxdz09

For more information, contact the Rev. Dr. Bradley S. Hauff, Commissioner for Indigenous Ministries, The Episcopal Church, at bhauff@episcopalchurch.org

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the Decolonization Alliance, email lbautista@umcjustice.org. For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com

Chinese Language Day

Language Days at the United Nations seek to celebrate multilingualism and cultural diversity as well as to promote equal use of all six official languages throughout the Organization. Under the initiative, UN duty stations around the world celebrate six separate days, each dedicated to one of the Organization’s six official languages.

Why April 20?

The date for the Chinese day was selected from Guyu (“Rain of Millet”), which is the 6th of 24 solar terms in the traditional East Asian calendars, to pay tribute to Cangjie. Cangjie is a very important figure in ancient China, claimed to be an official historian of the Yellow Emperor and the inventor of Chinese characters. Legend has it that he had four eyes and four pupils, and that when he invented the characters, the deities and ghosts cried and the sky rained millet. From then on, Chinese people celebrate the day Guyu in honour of Cangjie. In the Gregorian calendar, it usually begins around April 20.

For more information about this UN observance, the five other official languages, and relevant events, please visit un.org/zh/observances/chinese-language-day/english.

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CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

Language and Migration: Experience and Memory

Language and Migration: Experience and Memory Symposium

This interdisciplinary symposium will convene humanists and social scientists, field-workers and policy-makers, artists and writers, to think together about migrants as resourceful users, interpreters, and creators of language.

Language is a vital, but underexplored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. Distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

The symposium will take place online between Monday, April 19 and Saturday May 1, 2021.

Special events: Our symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Prof. Sarah Dryden-Peterson of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, who will open our exchange with a lecture on Monday April 19; and ProfViet Thanh Nguyen, Aerol Arnold Professor of English, University of Southern California, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Sympathizer, who will close the proceedings with a lecture on Saturday, May 1. On Friday evening, April 30, we are delighted to host a reading by Jhumpa Lahiri, Yiyun Li and Aleksandar Hemon, three distinguished members of Princeton’s Creative Writing faculty.

The symposium program can be found here.

Registration information can be found here. There will be one zoom link for the entire conference. (Panelists and chairs will also receive a special link for their sessions.)

Our primary sponsors are the Migration Lab of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, and the Study Group for Language and the United Nations. We’d like to acknowledge additional support from the Center for Applied Linguistics, the Esperantic Studies Foundation, the Centre for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems, and Birkbeck, University of London. At Princeton, generous support has also come from the Lewis Center, the Humanities Council, the Department of English, the Department of Comparative Literature, The Department of African-American Studies, and the University Center for Human Values.

Please direct questions to Sam Evans at same@princeton.edu

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CoNGO Notes: CoNGO is currently in the process of constituting an NGO Committee on Language and Languages and is calling for endorsement of the creation of this important committee. For information on this new committee, visit here. For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

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