self-determination

Regular Pathways and Irregular Migration

Join GRFDT in the second round of virtual meetings, this one focused on “Regular Pathways and Irregular Migration.” This round will build on the action points from the first round. A moderator will guide the 90-minute open conversations and will go around the regions to collect participants’ insights.

Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJMkce6grjsrHtVe4SfYkG-gUWPFyW72hYo3

Recognize that in the absence of adequate, rights-respecting regular migration pathways, people who need to move for livelihood or other reasons will still do so and must not be criminalized for it.

Moderator: Mr. Oscar A. Chacon – Executive Director, Alianza Americas

Action Points:

1. Change the narratives – towards a reconceptualization approach

2. Unpack irregular migration into different thematics (intersectionality)

3. Pushing for the principle of non-discrimination

4. Moving forward with a multilateral approach

5. Family reunification

6. Temporary labour migration

7. Regular pathways and climate change

The Organizers: Migrant Forum in Asia (MFA), the Cross-Regional Center for Refugees and Migrants (CCRM), the Global Research Forum on Diaspora and Transnationalism (GRFDT), the Civil Society Action CommitteeAlianza Americas, the Platform for International Cooperation on Undocumented Migrants (PICUM), and the Climate Migration & Displacement Platform (CMDP)

Simultaneous interpretation in Arabic, English, French, & Spanish

______________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Social Development, please visit ngosocdev.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bobbinassar@gmail.com or bknotts@uua.org. 

Gearing Up for Glasgow: Faith, Climate Action and COP26

Hello everyone,
Warm greetings! If any of you are based in the UK or are interested in working with UK-based faith communities in the lead-up to COP26, please do join a special online gathering on Tuesday, 1 June, 6:30pm BST.
Register here!
Background: 

The UK hosts the United Nations Climate Change summit (COP26) this November, where governments will gather to negotiate the future of our planet. Civil society groups, including faith communities, are ramping up their actions on climate justice in the leadup to COP26.

Many of us have already been involved in excellent workshops and webinars this year, equipping us with the information and skills we need to act. This session is ideal for you if you are:

  • Based in the UK, or work with groups based in the UK
  • A person of (any) faith and/or would like to work with faith communities
  • Focusing on COP26 in your work on climate change
  • Eager to amplify your actions by connecting with others

This online session will provide an open, flexible space for you to join up with others who want to take similar actions. Be prepared to come with ideas and plans to work with others and to form connections organically. You will:

  • Join with climate activists from different faith traditions linking up on a geographical, tactical or issue basis
  • Explore and engage with in-depth conversations to enable exciting plans to emerge
  • Have opportunities to move with other faith activists from mobilising for events to organising your own actions
  • Connect your climate activism with the work of Make COP Count, the COP26 Coalition and the wider climate justice movement

When you register, tell us what themes or ideas you would like the breakout rooms to hold. We want the session to provide you with the space to develop the networks and relationships you need to take action. You will be able to move between breakout rooms throughout the session, or join new ones based on new themes or actions that emerge.

Agenda:

6:30  Welcome and introductions
6:45  Breakout discussions
7:30  Plenary feedback
7:40  Announcements and sharings: Make COP Count and the COP26 Coalition
8:00  Close

_______________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Spirituality, Values, and Global Concerns-NY, please visit csvgc-ny.org. For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org.

International Week of Solidarity with People of Non-Self-Governing Territories

In the UN Charter, a Non-Self-Governing Territory is defined as a Territory “whose people have not yet attained a full measure of self-government.”

In 1946, several UN Member States identified a number of Territories under their administration that were not self-governing and placed them on a UN list. Countries administering Non-Self-Governing Territories are called administering Powers.  As a result of the decolonization process over the years, most of the Territories were removed from the list.

Chapter XI of the UN Charter – the Declaration regarding Non-Self-Governing Territories – provides that Member States administering Territories, which have not attained self-government recognize “that the interests of the inhabitants of these Territories are paramount” and accept as a “sacred trust” the obligation to promote their well-being.

Chapter IX urged the administering Powers concerned to take effective measures to safeguard and guarantee the inalienable rights of the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories to their natural resources, including land, and to establish and maintain control over the future development of those resources, and requested the Administering Powers to take all necessary steps to protect the property rights of the peoples of those Territories.

Administering Powers, in addition to ensuring the political, economic, social and educational advancement of the peoples, undertake to assist them in developing self-government and democratic political institutions. Administering Powers have an obligation to transmit regularly to the Secretary-General information on the economic, social and educational conditions in the Territories under their administration.

Chapter IX also urged all States, directly and through their action in the specialized agencies and other organizations of the United Nations system, to provide moral and material assistance to the peoples of the Non-Self-Governing Territories.

To learn more about the history of this UN observance and view the UN’s educational videos on decolonization, visit un.org/en/observances/non-self-governing-week.

______________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the Decolonization Alliance, please email lbautista@umcjustice.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com.

World Day for Cultural Diversity for Dialogue and Development

Cultural events cancelled, cultural institutions closed, community cultural practices suspended, empty UNESCO World Heritage sites, heightened risk of looting of cultural sites and poaching at natural sites, artists unable to make ends meet and the cultural tourism sector greatly affected… The impact of COVID-19 on the cultural sector is being felt around the world. This impact is social, economic and political – it affects the fundamental right of access to culture, the social rights of artists and creative professionals, and the protection of a diversity of cultural expressions.

The unfolding crisis risks deepening inequalities and rendering communities vulnerable. In addition, the creative and cultural industries (CCI) contribute US$2,250bn to the global economy (3% of GDP) and account for 29.5 million jobs worldwide. The economic fall-out of not addressing the cultural sector – and all auxiliary services, particularly in the tourism sector – could also be disastrous. (source “Culture & COVID-19: Impact and Response Tracker – Issue 2

Why does cultural diversity matter?

Three-quarters of the world’s major conflicts have a cultural dimension. Bridging the gap between cultures is urgent and necessary for peace, stability and development.

Cultural diversity is a driving force of development, not only with respect to economic growth, but also as a means of leading a more fulfilling intellectual, emotional, moral and spiritual life. This is captured in the culture conventions, which provide a solid basis for the promotion of cultural diversity. Cultural diversity is thus an asset that is indispensable for poverty reduction and the achievement of sustainable development.

At the same time, acceptance and recognition of cultural diversity – in particular through innovative use of media and Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) – are conducive to dialogue among civilizations and cultures, respect and mutual understanding.

To read more about the origin of this observance and peruse relevant materials, visit un.org/en/observances/cultural-diversity-day.

______________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org

 

Identity at the Intersection of Indigeneity and Christianity: An Indigenous Dilemma

You are invited to a virtual side event on the margins of the 20th Session of the United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Issues: Identity at the intersection of Indigeneity and Christianity: An Indigenous Dilemma

Indigenous Christians are an important group with a distinct voice that must be represented on the global stage. Reconciliation processes between Christianity and indigeneity have already begun, within churches and with indigenous people at the centre. As Christian networks and organizations, we are hosting this event in an effort to facilitate these difficult conversations in an open forum, giving all participants an opportunity to contribute their stories and lived experiences.

This conversation aims to make room for the voices of Indigenous Christians at the UNPFII and to engage in a dialogue with partners and other stakeholders, fostering mutual respect and enhance collaboration on the most important issues facing indigenous communities today.

Organized by:

Anglican Communion, Lutheran World Federation, United Methodist Church – General Board of Church & Society, the Episcopal Church, and the World Council of Churches

________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP. For more information on the Committee of Religious NGOs at the United Nations, please visit rngos.wordpress.com

Urgently Addressing Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue – Small States, Indigenous People, Youth and Faith Perspectives

Dear friends,

Greetings from Switzerland. On behalf of our Economic and Ecological Justice Programme, please accept this invitation to attend  the upcoming webinar offered by the Geneva Interfaith Forum on Climate Change, Environment and Human Rights (GIF) on the occasion of the 46th Session of the UN Human Rights Council on the theme: Urgently Addressing Climate Change as a Human Rights Issue – Small Island States, Indigenous Peoples, Youth and Faith Perspectives on Friday, 26 March 2021 at 10:00-11:30 AM Central European Time (CET)

Please register through this link: https://lutheranworld-org.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_HAa2Yn5TThmpHYdKRMfGAw

or watch on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dejg58UiRPk

Background:

Climate change is a human rights issue. It is one of the most urgent human rights issues of our time, directly as well as indirectly threatening the enjoyment and realisation of human rights of all. The small island and least developed countries are particularly vulnerable. The Indigenous Peoples, youth and people living in poverty are affected in unequal ways.

Though the most recent scientific data conclude that climate change is accelerating and demands an urgent and coordinated response, there is as yet no dedicated mechanism at the Human Rights Council (HRC) – the United Nations body responsible for promoting and protecting human rights – that tackles climate change in a holistic, systematic, and consistent manner. Moreover, there is a clear need to strengthen the connection between the HRC and the key international frameworks governing global climate change negotiations.

During the 46th session of the HRC, the Permanent Mission of Bangladesh delivered a statement, on behalf of 53 other states, calling for effective global climate actions in order to promote and protect the human rights of all and calling upon the Council to consider creating a new Special Rapporteur on human rights and climate change. A similar call was also made by the Republic of the Marshall Islands on behalf of the Climate Vulnerable Forum (CVF) during the 44th Session of the HRC in 2020.

This event is organised in conjunction with the 46th Session of the HRC to bring together voices and visions from small island states, Indigenous Peoples, youth, and faith communities with a view to establishing the connections between climate change and human rights as well as sharing information about concrete proposals and initiatives for addressing the human rights impacts of climate change in this context.

Speakers

  • Mr. Didier Georges, Haiti, Permanent Mission of Haiti to the UN in Geneva
  • Mr. Yves Lador, Switzerland, Earthjustice
  • Sis Jayanti Kirpalani, United Kingdom, Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University
  • Ms. Aldonna Purba, Indonesia, Lutheran World Federation Youth voice
  • Ms. Beverly Longid, Philippines, Indigenous Peoples Movement for Self-Determination and Liberation
  • Rev. James Bhagwan, Fiji, Pacific Conference of Churches Moderator
  • Ms. Alexandra M Goossens-Ishii, Soka Gakkai International & Geneva Interfaith Forum on Climate Change, Environment and Human Rights (GIF)

______________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Financing for Development, please visit ngosonffd.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Human Rights, please email the co-chairs at bknotts@uua.org or bobbinassar@gmail.com. For more information on the NGO Committee on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, please visit facebook.com/NGOCoRIP.