social science

[IFA Global Cafe] Conversation w/ Dr. Sara Ulla Díez on the Importance of Evaluation in the Growth of Age-friendly Communities

IFA Global Cafe: In Conversation with Dr. Sara Ulla Díez on the Importance of Evaluation in the Growth of Age-friendly Communities

In 2007, the WHO launched the Age-Friendly Communities (AFCs) initiative to promote a more thoughtful approach to the development of communities that could advance the well-being of individuals of all ages. In recent years, age-friendly communities around the world are meeting new milestones and are turning their attention to the crucial need for evaluation and the establishment of strong evaluative frameworks.

As an experienced research director and statistics advisor, Dr. Sara Ulla Díez has dedicated more than 20 years to evaluation and applied research in health and international cooperation for development.

Register here: https://zoom.us/meeting/register/tJAtcO2orzorHNPE-7lpiPbdhagMCNa4tD2p

This Global Cafe will be recorded and streamed live on Facebook. Should you be unable to participate, a recording will be available on the IFA Facebook page at facebook.com/intfedageing and resources will be available at: ifa.ngo/ifa-virtual-town-hall-resources.

____________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Ageing-NY, please visit ngocoa-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Ageing-Vienna, please visit ngoageingvie.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Ageing-Geneva, please visit ageingcommitteegeneva.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

Some are Hazardous Environmental Legacy Sites, some are Monsters: Why sustainable development needs to include environmental crime

The Committee on Sustainable Development cordially invites its member organisations to a talk by Prof. Verena Winiwarter (BOKU) on Some are Hazardous Environmental Legacy Sites, some are Monsters: Why sustainable development needs to include environmental crime.

Time 6:30pm – 8:30pm (Vienna)/ 12:30 – 2:30pm EST

Zoom Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87097371746?pwd=SHp0b3ROWnlCSzZmMzJ6TlFmWU1PUT09

Meeting ID: 870 9737 1746       Kenncode: 240089

About Verena Winiwarter

Professor of Environmental History at Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt since 2007, Verena Winiwarter transferred to BOKU 2018 with the Institute of Social Ecology. She holds a PhD in Environmental History (1998) and a venia legendi in Human Ecology (2003) from University of Vienna. Since 2016, she is a full member of the Austrian Academy of Sciences (OEAW), Chairperson of the Commission for Interdisciplinary Ecological Studies, and co-founded the European Society of Environmental History. Her main research interests comprise the history of landscapes, in particular rivers and the environmental history of soils and legacy sites. Her 2014 co-authored book “Umwelt hat Geschichte. Sechzig Reisen durch die Zeit” was elected as Wissenschaftsbuch des Jahres in Austria and Umweltbuch des Jahres in Germany and is now in its 3rd imprint. In 2013, she was „WissenschaftlerIn des Jahres“ in Austria and in December 2019 she was awarded the “Preis der Stadt Wien für Geisteswissenschaften”.

To register please send an e-mail to the secretary (ngocsd.vienna@gmail.com). We look forward to seeing you!

________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-Vienna, please visit ngocsdvienna.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Sustainable Development-NY, please visit ngocsd-ny.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Disarmament, Peace, and Security, please visit ngocdps.wordpress.com.

Language and Migration: Experience and Memory

Language and Migration: Experience and Memory Symposium

This interdisciplinary symposium will convene humanists and social scientists, field-workers and policy-makers, artists and writers, to think together about migrants as resourceful users, interpreters, and creators of language.

Language is a vital, but underexplored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. Distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

The symposium will take place online between Monday, April 19 and Saturday May 1, 2021.

Special events: Our symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Prof. Sarah Dryden-Peterson of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, who will open our exchange with a lecture on Monday April 19; and ProfViet Thanh Nguyen, Aerol Arnold Professor of English, University of Southern California, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Sympathizer, who will close the proceedings with a lecture on Saturday, May 1. On Friday evening, April 30, we are delighted to host a reading by Jhumpa Lahiri, Yiyun Li and Aleksandar Hemon, three distinguished members of Princeton’s Creative Writing faculty.

The symposium program can be found here.

Registration information can be found here. There will be one zoom link for the entire conference. (Panelists and chairs will also receive a special link for their sessions.)

Our primary sponsors are the Migration Lab of the Princeton Institute for International and Regional Studies, and the Study Group for Language and the United Nations. We’d like to acknowledge additional support from the Center for Applied Linguistics, the Esperantic Studies Foundation, the Centre for Research and Documentation on World Language Problems, and Birkbeck, University of London. At Princeton, generous support has also come from the Lewis Center, the Humanities Council, the Department of English, the Department of Comparative Literature, The Department of African-American Studies, and the University Center for Human Values.

Please direct questions to Sam Evans at same@princeton.edu

___________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: CoNGO is currently in the process of constituting an NGO Committee on Language and Languages and is calling for endorsement of the creation of this important committee. For information on this new committee, visit here. For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.

Language and Migration: Experience and Memory

Language is a vital, but under-explored, factor in the lives of migrants, immigrants and refugees. It has a direct impact on the experiences and choices of individuals displaced by war, terror, or natural disasters and the decisions made by agents who provide (or fail to provide) relief, services, and status. Distilled through memory, it shapes the fictions, poems, memoirs, films and song lyrics in which migrants render loss and displacement, integration and discovery, the translation of history and culture, and the trials of identity.

This interdisciplinary symposium will convene humanists and social scientists, field-workers and policy-makers, artists and writers, to think together about migrants as resourceful users, interpreters, and creators of language.

The symposium will take place online between Monday, April 19 and Saturday May 1, 2021. Amid the disappointment of not being able to hold the symposium in person, we’ve managed to find two advantages to the virtual format: to enable participation by those without the means or time to attend, and to achieve a more satisfying exchange among humanists, social scientists, and people who work in the fields of education, language policy and language justice. We encourage you to attend as many sessions of the symposium as you can, which are spread out over two weeks to avoid zoom fatigue.

Special events: Our symposium will feature two keynote speakers: Prof. Sarah Dryden-Peterson of the Harvard Graduate School of Education, who will open our symposium with a lecture on Monday April 19; and ProfViet Thanh Nguyen, Aerol Arnold Professor of English, University of Southern California, and winner of the Pulitzer Prize for The Sympathizer, who will give the closing lecture on Saturday May 1. On Friday evening, April 30, we are delighted to host a reading by Jhumpa LahiriYiyun Li and Aleksandar Hemon, three distinguished members of Princeton’s Creative Writing faculty.

Access the full detailed program here: https://migration.princeton.edu/symposium/program

Learn more here: https://princeton.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_GNf33xbFR1O9wdsn38Hk6Q

________________________________________________________________________________________

CoNGO Notes: For more information on the NGO Committee on Migration, please visit ngo-migration.org. For more information on the NGO Committee on Education, Learning, and Literacy, please visit facebook.com/NGOCELLatUN.